Social Insecurity

It happens quite frequently in these Excited States of America: Dire alarms are raised in the various news media whose audience is the Boomer generation, that the system of Social Security payments is under attack or financially unsound.
No wonder! Millions of Americans depend on that money showing up every month, and millions would undoubtedly be in tough shape without it. Not all Boomers are well off, retiring in the lap of luxury as they go about all their medical appointments and load up their pills-for-each-day containers each week. A great many, for various reasons, fell through the cracks of the Great Prosperity that followed the Great Depression and (Second) Great War. A lot never got what might have seemed their allotted portion of the Great American Pie in the heyday of the American Empire.
Most of that pie went to those who survived the Depression and War: their reward for endurance. The Boomers reached adulthood — okay, okay, a lot of the younger folks apparently think the Boomers never grew up — just as America peaked and started its unavoidable slide: the late ‘60s and ‘70s.
Sure, business was going great guns (in more ways than one) in that era, but if one looks at the her/history of the times, it really was crazy, man. And not many other than M. King Hubbert (note: NOT L. Ron Hubbard) noticed that the item that underpinned it all — cheap oil — began its inevitable path of depletion in the early ‘70s. We’re all living through the early stages of the Long Emergency, or Long Descent.(1)
The point is that Social Security and every other aspect of a growth economy have reached the end stages of their viability.
Just look at the cycles of the outer planets — the ones that relate to historical developments over an extended time scale (more than the twenty years of a Jupiter-Saturn cycle).
The starting point is the signing of the Social Security Act by President Franklin Roosevelt on the summer afternoon of a Full Moon day. (Those basic facts might cause one to associate Social Security with a popular song of the era: “Summertime, and the Living Is Easy.”)

One cycle is quite obvious: the return of Uranus to the starting point in an early degree of Taurus, the zoidion (sign) most associated with financial security on a personal level. This month’s New Moon opposite Uranus is a signal that something big and new is in the works and about to break into public consciousness.
There are likely to be one or more major developments or announcements between now and the Full Moon days. While that occurs on the twelfth of November — with Luna shining brightest in the money sign Taurus, in company with Uranus the disruptor — the following five days continue the prime time.
Next in line: Neptune, transiting lately opposite Neptune in the Social Security chart (and opposite where Neptune was in 1776). The 1930s and 1960s (marked by Medicare) were the two peak periods in social welfare programs, correlating first with Neptune’s passage through Virgo, then Uranus’ and Pluto’s.
Lastly: Pluto, now attaining the halfway mark from Pluto’s place in 1935 (and returning to Pluto’s place in 1776): Pluto being associated with the most inexorable, life-and-death forces working toward evolution on a collective level.
Thus, one can begin to appreciate that the great struggle of this time over the collective soul, if you will, of the Excited States includes, prominently, the disposition or overhaul and continuation of the apparatus of social welfare. (As with pretty much everything about the ways that life has come to be organized, devolution to more regional or local realms is a safe bet.)
There are a great many other points of interest about this chart, but there is no need to invite confusion with excessive detail.
There is merely one essential fact: Nothing is forever, everything must over time change and die. Human institutions are no more immune than individual humans.

(1) It takes 60 Iraqi conventional oil wells to produce 1 million barrels of oil per day.
How many US shale wells does it take to produce the same amount?
a) 30
b) 60
c) 100
d) 2,500

Answer: d) 2,500
source: Bloomberg News, 27 Feb. 2014
Tag: The Shale Revolution aint all it’s fracked up to be.
Re-publication:
Resilience.org

Each month, on the first of the month, a more personalized article, written with Aeolea Wendy Burwell, is published. Check it out here.

2 thoughts on “Social Insecurity”

  1. This is an outstanding article! You amaze me how you pull in facts to support the astrology forecast for Social Security, and I loved the touch of adding song titles in the era. You added another layer to to senses to aborb even more what you were conveying. Now I’m waiting to see what unfolds soon. Hopefully, this news won’t get buried in the quagmire of the scandalous news.

    1. Thanks so much for your generous words. It was such a temptation to dig into every little detail of that chart! Often, less is more.

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