Flight Time

You feel it too, right? — this sense of greater possibility and trust in the flow of events (mass shootings to the contrary).
As so many astrological podcasters and Youtubers are pointing out this early August 2019, the current clustering of planets in fire zoidion Leo — adding to the enthusiasm represented by Jupiter in Sagittarius for the year — is a great time for venturing or just being involved in a fine party that supports the creation or extension of strong interpersonal connections.
Here’s a story that fits right in with these energies, and confirms the importance of appropriate timing: electional astrology (electing as in choosing an optimum time).

It’s the story of Franky Zapata’s crossing of the English Channel on a “flyboard” of his own design. A flyboard, you say? He and his invention — powered by five mini-turbo engines — wowed a lot of folks on Bastille Day (14 July), zooming around near the Champs-Elysees. That demonstration was easy, he said: using only three percent of the machine’s capabilities.
The real demonstration — crossing the Channel in two hops, each power pack capable of operating for about ten minutes — was scheduled for and attempted on 25 July, starting from Sangatte, France, at 9:05 a.m. The occasion was the one-hundred-tenth anniversary of aviation pioneer Louis Bleriot’s crossing. This time, the flight went well until the refueling stop mid-Channel.
Complete success was unlikely under the basic rules of astrology: The early Virgo ascendant, whose “lord” is Mercury (retrograde though exactly conjunct Venus), indicates initial plans likely going awry, though not in any disastrous way. And Luna’s close approach to Uranus in the ninth place — the zone pertinent to travel across water — virtually promises disruption, even though highlighting the latest technology.
The chart is of the diurnal sect: Sol above the horizon. That means that Mars, the out-of-sect “malefic,” would represent the greater type of challenges along the way. It would have been a better elected date or time if Mars were not linked with Sol. With Sol in the same zoidion, Mars points toward problems involving excess heat or too-fast combustion of fuel — something of that nature. While that apparently has not been reported, it does not mean that was not the situation.

Now have a look at the chart (below) for the start of the second attempt: 4 August 2019, moments before sunrise at 6:17 a.m., at Sangatte. Venus, “benefic of sect” for this technically nocturnal chart, is rising just before Sol: This indicates that conditions are ripe for exuberant success. Even though in her “underworld phase” (invisible due to proximity to Sol), Venus smiles on this heroic effort.
Additionally, Mercury has since the first attempt ended its disappearance during its retrograde phase, and is now heliacally rising in the morning sky: that is, separating from Sol’s glare. Mercury, now seventeen degrees from Sol, may even have been briefly visible somewhat earlier in the morning. Not only that: Mercury is exactly sextile (sixty degrees) from Luna in Mercury’s sign. Excellent indication that any technical glitches had been worked through.

It wasn’t quite the way the aeronauts of a century ago went about their venturing: Zapata was escorted by three helicopters along the route. Still, it was quite the zippy trip: speeds up to 110 miles per hour at heights only fifty to sixty-five feet above the water.
And he had paid the required price of developing the technology: the loss of two fingers to the turbines.
That alone ought to suffice as a sobering reminder that every great venture carries a price, often in blood.

(See another of my stories on electional astrology in the case of the cargo ship “El Faro,” on my previous, still-available blog Astroplethorama.)