New Year New Life

April — the hottest month — is the time to start over in Myanmar, better known as Burma. Where, you say? It’s stuck in that space between India, the second-most populous country and home of Bollywood, and Thailand, favorite Asian vacation spot. Myanmar is almost as little known as North Korea. (Decades of military rule doesn’t help make a country attractive.)
The weather there come April is usually so hot that folks typically welcome a dousing with water. So folks make a festival of it, and base their year on the lunar cycle.
Apparently this is year 1381 in the Myanmar Calendar — I have no idea why that would be so — which has alternating months of 29 and 30 days. Since six pair only comes to a total of 354 days, and an actual complete revolution by Earth around Sol takes about 365 days, those folks throw in an extra month every three years to make up for the messiness.By April the weather is so dang hot that everyone agrees that throwing a lot of water on each other is pretty much the thing to do. People smile and say thank you and bless you. The people have built up a belief that all the sins they have committed during the past year can be cleansed away with the water that’s thrown on them. All sins and delusions are washed away from body, mind and soul. Instead of resolutions soon forgotten, New Year starts with a purified existence.
The Thingyan festival is held at the Full Moon, and lasts for three or four days, depending on what the astrologers there decree. Apparently it’s much the same across the border in Thailand, where they call it Songkran.
The Myanmar version literally means “moving from one thing into another,” or “changing over.”
It’s long been a customary time for political and legal amnesties, though one has to wonder how long a lot of those freed remain so.
Perhaps 1381 — a numerological “four” year — for some reason is the occasion for an especially large amnesty, since thousands were released on two days in April, another 6250 on 6 May.
What brought a wave of notice around the world was the release on the latter date of two Reuters reporters who had been held in detention for over 500 days. They had been touching on a subject which the military government doesn’t want publicized.
“Before their arrest in December 2017, they had been working on an investigation into the killing of 10 Rohingya Muslim men and boys by security forces and Buddhist civilians in western Myanmar’s Rakhine State during an army crackdown that began in August 2017. The operation sent more than 730,000 Rohingya fleeing to Bangladesh, according to U.N. estimates.”

Hmmm . . . August 2017, what was happening celestially back then? Oh yes, there was a certain solar eclipse, late in the zoidion of Leo, with Mars just then emerging from the solar rays, at twenty-one degrees Leo at that moment. That made a strong connection with the Burmese independence chart of 4 January 1948: independence accepted from Britain five months after the deadly partition of Pakistan from India as those gained independence from the Empire. (According to reports documented in Nicholas Campion’s Book of World Horoscopes, the Burmese moment was elected, i.e. chosen, by selected astrologers.)
Mars at that eclipse moment in 2017 was closely conjunct Saturn in the Burmese national chart, and widely conjunct the Pluto placement in that chart. That spells activation of repressive currents in the collective: currents that involve elements of the population regarded as foreign: in this case, the Rohingya.

Mercury (planet of journalism) in the eclipse chart is retrograde and closely conjunct the national Mars placement, signaling an uneasy connection between reporters on the one hand, and military and police forces on the other. No wonder there was a high-profile detention.
There are other indications of a testing-time for the country: The eclipse placement of Saturn in the first house (national identity and security) of the independence chart, bringing to the forefront a sense of threat to the collective well-being; and Neptune at the lower meridian, reflecting conditions of dissolution of the established state of affairs.
Within months of the eclipse, Saturn moved from Sagittarius to Capricorn, joining Pluto there and beginning a crucial period reminiscent of 1948, when Saturn and Pluto were also traveling together. Such astrological recurrences coincide with major episodes of dealing with issues of control, repression and restructuring. A time marked by much pain and loss. The expulsion of three-quarters of a million people, and unknown numbers of lives lost, is only the most obvious.
Political entities never welcome the holding of dark deeds to the light of day. Wa Lone, 33, and Kyaw Soe Oo, 29, had to have known of the grave risk they were undertaking. Yet they persisted in maintaining their innocence and dedication to their roles.
The last release date — the day after the New Moon that followed the Thingyan Full Moon — coincided with a Mars-Jupiter opposition, in itself a combination of generally uplifting energies. And Mars-Jupiter connected exactly with Uranus (liberation, reversal) in the national chart. It was an auspicious moment for opening a new chapter, perhaps with greater openness than before.

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